Tag Archives: Rottindean

Cat and Blackbird in the Garden, Peregrine on the Cliffs

A long descriptive title, but there’s little in the way of a theme to today’s post. Just a collection of photos, starting with a blackbird in the garden.

Female blackbird

Female blackbird

Female blackbird

Female blackbird

Overhead, a buzzard put in an appearance, to the annoyance of the local gulls.

Buzzard

This is a neighbour’s cat (which uses our garden a lot), jumping up on the fringe of the pond. For some reason it likes that spot 😉 The first three are consecutive frames, which are a nice demonstration of the benefits of the 10fps capability of the 7D Mark II.

Cat jumping up on to wall

Cat jumping up on to wall

Cat jumping up on to wall

Cat (close-up)

Cat stepping over pond

Later in the day we headed down to Rottingdean, taking advantage of a mild and sunny afternoon.

Rottingdean Undercliff walk

The Undercliff Walk at Rottingdean

The first rise of cliffs in the distance is Saltdean, and beyond that are Telscombe Cliffs. We didn’t go as far as Telscombe, but I did take a couple of long range shots of one of its residents. This is uncropped, taken at 400mm.

Peregrine falcon

Peregrine falcon perched high on Telscombe Cliffs

And now a couple of crops (with the 1.4 extender added). It’s still a very long way off.

Peregrine falcon

Peregrine falcon

Camera note: all photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L USM IS lens. The final two shots had the Canon EF 1.4xIII extender added.

Posted in Bird of Prey, Birds, cat, coastal, Landscape, Seaside Views, Wildlife Also tagged , , , |

Friday Fulmars at Rottingdean

A short post tonight. The day has mainly been shades of grey though there was the hint of some light this morning when I had the chance to go down to Rottingdean. Inevitably I detoured along the cliffs where the fulmars were in full flight. There’s a strong colony of them roosting on the cliffs and their distinctive cackle now dominates the more raucous squawking of the gulls.

fulmar at Rottigndean

fulmar at Rottigndean

fulmars nesting at Rottigndean

fulmar at Rottigndean

fulmar at Rottigndean

And as it’s Friday, here’s a fox as well. This shot was taken a few minutes ago in the garden. I’m not really getting any closer but the 200mm lens may make it seem that way. The reality is that the foxes are still extremely cautious, but it’s progress. 😀

fox

Camera note: all fulmar photos taken with the Canon 7D and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L USM IS lens. The fox was photographed with the EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM lens.

Posted in Foxes, water birds Also tagged , |

Rottingdean Fulmar Attacked by Jackdaw (photo sequence)

I was down at Rottingdean fairly early this morning, on an errand but while I was there I headed down to the cliffs to check out the local fulmars. This is a good time of year to watch them as they prepare for breeding. There were plenty of them about, flying out over the sea and then doing their typical skimming along the cliffs trying to find a foothold.

Fulmar at Rottingdean

The usual pattern when they try to land is to fly up to the cliff face, turn away, fly a circuit and then try again. They have very weak legs and need to get their landing exactly right. It’s not always easy. I watched several fulmars play this game. Usually they are aiming at a nesting site but just occasionally they pick the wrong spot. As this one did. Here it is making touchdown on the cliff face.

Fulmar approaching a nesting hole

Fulmar approaching a nesting hole

Usually at that point it would either abort the landing, or settle. On this occasion it had chosen the wrong hole. This particular cavity in the cliff was already taken… by a jackdaw; and it was not happy about the uninvited guest. Jackdaws can be very aggressive, even with each other, as the fulmar was about to discover. This is what happened next.

Fulmar being attacked by a jackdaw

Fulmar being attacked by a jackdaw

Fulmar being attacked by a jackdaw

Fulmar being attacked by a jackdaw

Fulmar being attacked by a jackdaw

Fulmar being attacked by a jackdaw

After they separated the fulmar headed out to sea and the jackdaw returned to its roost.

As well as the fulmars and jackdaws, the cliffs are home to pipits, starlings and pigeons and so minor confrontations are common on the cliffs. Usually though, it’s a case of which bird can shout the loudest and longest. Fulmars invariably win that kind of contest!

Camera note: all photos taken with the Canon 7D and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L USM IS lens.

Posted in Birds, water birds Also tagged , |