Falmer Pond and a Blue Moon

That’s bit of a grand title, for what is simply my post this year about Falmer Pond. I was up there briefly this morning (early light, dull with a hint of rain) and then again at lunchtime when a little bit of sunshine appeared.

Although nothing especially unusual happens there, I like the peace and quiet and that occasionally there are one or two more interesting birds. Today was good day: a cormorant and a heron.

heron in tree

The heron was perched on the willow sited on the island in the centre of the pond.

Heron in flight

Heron in flight

Cormorant swimming

Cormorant swimming on Falmer Pond, East Sussex

Cormorant hanging itself out to dry

Cormorant hanging itself out to dry

And to mark the occasion, it’s what’s known as a blue moon today (the second full moon in the same calendar month). It’s also a super moon (at the closest point in its orbit). To be honest, it looks just like does every other time of the year, but I took a photo anyway.

Super Blue Moon

Super Blue Moon

Camera note: all photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens.

Peregrine at Moulsecoomb

Well I’ve finally kicked off the 2018 blog, with entry just squeezing into January. Other than the foxes I’ve not been taking too many pictures but I did get out briefly today in the sunshine. ‘Out’ being standing between some of the buildings at work, which just goes to prove that you really don’t need to go far to see wildlife.

It started with a buzzard…

buzzard

Buzzard over Moulsecoomb, Brighton

Nothing very fancy about that. There were two of them, gliding high overhead while the gulls circled.

Next up came a sparrowhawk. This one was on its own…

sparrowhawk

Sparrowhawk over Moulsecoomb, Brighton

Again, a very basic shot; but if there are buzzards and sparrowhawks about I keep looking. And sure enough, high among the gulls another bird appeared: a peregrine falcon (actually a pair). Being mobbed by a gull!

Peregrine falcon and gull

Peregrine falcon and gull

Peregrine falcon and gull

Peregrine falcon and gull

Peregrine falcon and gull

Peregrine falcon and gull

Peregrine falcon

Peregrine falcon over Moulsecoomb, Brighton

On the home front Pretty is still visiting regularly, and we can hear other foxes nearby. This is a recent shot of her to close.

Pretty Vixen finds a 'markie'

Pretty Vixen finds a ‘markie’

Camera note: all bird photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens. The fox photographed with the EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM lens.

A couple of fulmars and some end of year strays

This has without doubt been my quietest year on the blog. There are a number of reasons which have conspired to reduce my time for getting photos (or at last anything other than our wonderful foxes), but I hope to see some significant changes from next spring. Even when I do have time, the weather hasn’t been ideal, but I did get out yesterday and spent an hour or so at Rottingdean. If only the wildlife had shown up it would have been perfect.

What I did manage was a handful of shots of the few fulmars that were there (I expected rather more of them), a lone curlew and not much else.

fulmar

Fulmar at Rottingdean cliffs

fulmar

Fulmar at Rottingdean -does the shadow count as an additional sighting?

curlew

Curlew at Rottingdean

Of course this has been a wonderful year for the foxes. The summer was a joy with several very regular fox cubs showing up. That period came to its expected end in teh autumn as they start to disperse and compete for winter territory (and mates). The trail camera suggests that several of the young ones are still in the vicinity and I’ve had occasional sightings of the Little Dog Fox and Black Tail; but the stalwart has been Pretty, teh young vixen who has continued to be an almost daily visitor. These are a few recent photos of her.

fox

Pretty Vixen relaxing

fox

Pretty Vixen relaxing

fox

I’ve tweaked my favourite fox image of the year for the annual Festive Greeting, but this final image is a close second, not least because it’s a landscape of sorts… Rottingdean beach at low tide.

Blue seascape at Rottingdean

Blue seascape at Rottingdean

Camera note: all bird photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens. Foxes, mainly with the EF 24-105 F4L IS USM lens.