5 Fulmars on the 5th

This is my first post of 2017, so firstly a Happy New Year to everyone. I’m certainly hoping for a smoother year than the one we’ve just had, and with luck a few more photos.

I’m starting the year with five photos of the fabulous Rottingdean fulmars, taken this morning. I can watch these amazing birds for hours as they skim the cliffs and make their numerous attempts to land on the narrow ledges and crannies they call home. Most times they fail (their legs are not built for strength), but they do make it occasionally (assuming they can withstand the onslaught of fulmar-abuse from the current occupants (as you will see).

Fulmar flying along Rottingdean Cliffs, East Sussex

A landing attempt. The current occupant is not happy!

The fulmar retreats (only to try again)

Another fulmar fails to land!

But life can be sweet for fulmars, as this pair show.

Camera note: all photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens.

A little kestrel sequence

This is really the second part (or prequel) to yesterday’s post. Before heading to Rottingdean I’d been over at Sheepcote Valley in search of owls. No luck with them (though they are about). Instead I came across a kestrel who provided a brief but active sequence.

Kestrel at Sheepcote Valley, Brighton

Kestrel at Sheepcote Valley, Brighton

Kestrel at Sheepcote Valley, Brighton

Kestrel at Sheepcote Valley, Brighton

Kestrel at Sheepcote Valley, Brighton

I’m sort of running a day behind myself, but I will add this one from today. It’s a ‘Bravias arc’ or ‘upsidedown rainbow’ or ‘Smiley in the Sky’. It’s caused by light refracting on ice particles. They are related to ‘sundogs’ which tend to be vertical patches, but this was the first time I’ve seen an extended arc. The shot is taken with the camera pointing straight up to the sky.

Bavias arc or circumzenithal arc (also known as the Smiley in the Sky or Upsidedown Rainbow) seen over Woodingdean, East Sussex. The phenomenon is caused by a rare alignment of the angle of the sun with ice crystals in the atmosphere.

Camera note: all kestrel photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens. The sky-smiley was taken with the EF17-40mm f/4L USM lens.

Four Photos from Rottingdean

It was a unseasonably mild day today, with blue skies and almost no wind at all. Perfect in other words for taking a stroll along the Undercliff walk between Rottingdean and Brighton Marina.

Just four photos from the walk (an easy 2 miles in each direction). The first is the only wildlife shot (am I branching out? Probably not). It’s one of the rock pipits that scoot around the cliff face and occasionally pose for photos. This was taken near the tea rooms on the Undercliff.

Rock pipit at Rottingdean Cliffs, East Sussex

Next up is the Marina itself, effectively the half way point on the walk there and back. I’ve converted it to black and white, but other than that it’s just a typical view.

Brighton Marina

Another animal next, but a domestic one. The dog was enjoying itself chasing a ball, which it would carefully place in a rock pool and then bark until its human waded in to fetch it out again! One of my better ‘running dog’ attempts.

Dog running at Rottingdean

The last shot is a really nice example of graffiti painted on the one of the wooden groynes. It looks fairly new but I liked the balance and simplicity of it.

Graffiti at Rottingdean, East Sussex

Camera note: all photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens.