Tag Archives: little egret

White on White (little egret)

I took this short sequence at Seven Sisters Country Park, just outside Eastbourne today. The little egret is a non-native species that has colonized very successfully, and is now a quite stunning addition to the avian population.

Little egret in flight over the South Downs, Sussex

Little egret in flight over the South Downs, Sussex

Little egret in flight over the South Downs, Sussex

Little egret in flight over the South Downs, Sussex

Little egret in flight over the South Downs, Sussex

Little egret in flight over the South Downs, Sussex

Back in the garden the foxes are showing up (but proving as tricky to photograph as ever). Badgers? Yes, they’re here as well, and more than happy to pose for a quick photo!

Badger in garden

Badger in garden

Camera note: egrets taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens. I used the EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM for the badger.

Posted in Birds, water birds

Coastal Birds

This is the slightly overdue second part of my New Year’s Eve blog, and the promised bird life.

The tide was out which is always helpful for spotting the more unusual visitors as the seaweed-laden rocks are excellent feeding grounds. Oystercatchers are among the more regular visitors, though mussels rather than oysters are the mainstay of their diet.

Oystercatcher at Rottingdean, East Sussex

Oystercatcher at Rottingdean, East Sussex

Oystercatcher at Rottingdean, East Sussex

Oystercatcher at Rottingdean, East Sussex

Oystercatcher at Rottingdean, East Sussex

Oystercatcher at Rottingdean, East Sussex

Another fairly common visitor is the little egret. Several were feeding on the rocks, though they remain quite shy and prone to hop along the coast if disturbed.

Little egret at Rottingdean

Little egret at Rottingdean

Little egret at Rottingdean

Little egret at Rottingdean

Little egret with Brighton in the background

Little egret with Brighton in the background

Much harder to spot than the pure white egret are the much smaller ringed plovers. When in among the rocks and pebbles they all but disappear from view (perfect camouflage), but even they can’t remain hidden from view once they take to the air.

Ringed plovers at Rottingdean

Ringed plovers at Rottingdean

Finally, on many levels the pick of the bunch, a curlew. These large birds are very occasional visitors to the Rottingdean coast but make excellent use of their long curved bill to search out the tastiest food.

Curlew at Rottingdean Beach, East Sussex

Curlew at Rottingdean Beach, East Sussex

Curlew at Rottingdean Beach, East Sussex

Curlew at Rottingdean Beach, East Sussex

Camera note: all photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens.

Posted in water birds Also tagged , , |

Flying Over Seven Sisters

I was fortunate to be over near Seven Sisters Country Park early this morning, while the bright weather was still holding. It was windy (on my return journey trees were down and one was partially blocking the road outside Newhaven), and the Canada geese and little egrets were active.

I’ll start with the egrets, which are now essentially naturalized native birds.

Little egret at Seven Sisters Country Park

Little egret at Seven Sisters Country Park

Little egret at Seven Sisters Country Park

Little egret at Seven Sisters Country Park

Little egret over the South Downs at Seven Sisters Country Park

A small group of Canada geese were patrolling the fields, in ones and twos.

Canada geese

Canada goose

I can’t leave out the common mallard…

Mallard in flight

Or my first swift of the year. Few in number at the moment, but great to see them and a sure of improving weather.

Swift in flight

Swift in flight

No badgers or foxes tonight, but I’ve some good clips of both from the trail camera to put together (hopefully over the next few days).

Camera note: all photos taken with the Canon 7D Mark II and EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens.

Posted in water birds Also tagged , , |